How to Make Yourself Poop

How to be #1 in the #2 business:

On a perfect race morning, you’d wake up, have breakfast, and use the bathroom—at least once, maybe twice—and then head to your starting corral feeling great, not worrying whether you’ll have to stop along the way for an emergency Number 2.

But sometimes, your routine fails you. Maybe you’re traveling and in a different time zone, maybe your diet’s been a little off, or maybe you’ve just got a nervous stomach. But some mornings, you just can’t go, no matter how much you know it’s essential for a good run.

So what do you do now? We looked at the latest research, and talked with Felice Schnoll-Sussman, MD, a gastroenterologist at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University and a New York City marathon finisher, to find out. Here’s what science says about how to get yourself to go.

Source: How to Make Yourself Poop

Most think it’s the caffeine in coffee, but decaf works just the same.  No one wants to be immortalized like this guy, but it can be the defining moment to see how much you really want the result you trained for.  I already do some of what the article suggests – get up earlier, moving through the house as I get breakfast.  It depends, but often can feel like delayed reaction between when I got out of bed.

Teehee… backfire.

Alcohol Does Not Warm You Up – It Actually Cools You Down

Myth: drinking alcohol warms your body and can be used to prevent hypothermia.

In fact, drinking alcohol helps lower the core temperature of your body.  This myth likely got its start thanks to the fact that drinking alcoholic beverages will make you feel warmer as your blood/alcohol level rises.

…if you’re one of those people who gets flushed quickly when drinking even small amounts of alcohol, you’ll likely see your core temperature drop even faster than most when drinking in frigid environments.

Source: Alcohol Does Not Help Prevent Hypothermia, It Actually Makes It More Likely