Use Chickpea Liquid to Make the Fluffiest Egg-Free Pancakes Ever

Recipes and techniques generally advance in baby steps. It’s rare that you find a technique so far out of left field that it changes the way people think about food overnight. Sous vide cooking is up there, as is no-knead bread. In the world of vegan cuisine, nothing has shaken things up like aquafaba—the recently coined term for the liquid inside a can of cooked beans. It’s the kind of technique that’s so mind-blowingly simple that I’m amazed nobody discovered it until just a couple of years ago.

Source: Use Aquafaba to Make Extra-Light, Fluffy Egg-Free or Vegan Pancakes

I discovered aquafaba with a recipe for two ingredient meringues a few months ago. It has since nearly completely replaced my use of prepackaged egg substitutes. I am eating a lot more chickpeas now as a result. I’ve also found that canned chickpeas freeze well and defrost quickly.

Use Egg Wrappers Instead of Tortillas for Protein-Packed Sandwiches

I have a thing for pinwheel sandwiches; they’re just so pretty and such perfect finger foods. What if you could skip the tortilla or traditional wrap and use protein-loaded eggs instead? These wraps take the trifecta of breakfast foods, ham, eggs, and cheese, and turn them into portable bites that can work as breakfast or lunch.

Source: Recipe: Egg Wraps with Ham and Greens

Better yet – don’t use flour or cornstarch, but add a little bit of cream cheese and a bit of almond flour to do the same thing without cranking the carbohydrates back up.

  • two eggs
  • tablespoon of cream cheese
  • 1/2 tablespoon of the almond flour

Put it all in a small bullet blender, and blend the snot out of it.  Then pour into a large pan so it’s nice and thin. Adjust the ingredients to make it thinner or thicker, as needed.

Another good use, do the same recipe – add a 1/8th tsp of cinnamon and vanilla but pour in a smaller pan to make basically crepes that area fantastic replacement for pancakes that have almost no carbs in them or for use with sweet instead of savory.

Use Coffee Instead of Water in Your Batter for a Rich, Flavorful Cake

Whatever your stance on cake mixes, you can agree on one thing: they can always stand a little improvement. Thankfully, mixes are incredibly easy to soup up; substitute an ingredient here or add an ingredient there, and you’ll have all the flavor of a homemade cake, with all the ease of a boxed mix. Here are eight awesome ways to make your boxed cake mix taste homemade.

Source: 8 Tricks That Make Boxed Taste Like Homemade

Please warn those to whom you serve the cake that you put coffee in it. It’s a rare sensitivity, but coffee really does make some sick.

What to Smell for to Check if Your Oil Is Rancid

“Rancid.” Even the word sounds gross. Or at the very least, like a super-angry punk band. Either way, it’s definitely not how you’d want anyone to describe the food you’re eating. The first step to side-stepping rancidity? Know your enemy.

Source: How to Tell If Your Food Is Rancid (Ew)

Don’t start putting your olive oil in the fridge – it will solidify, and then you can’t use it. Just keep it away from direct heat, keep it sealed, and away from light. As long as you go through it at a reasonable rate, you should be okay.

Skip Vermont and Make Delicious Maple Candies With Two Ingredients

If you crave the sweet maple candies sold at tourist shops, you need not wait until your next vacation to enjoy them. Maple syrup producers’ associations are eager to share these treats, and how to make them at home, to spread the gospel of pure maple syrup. This recipe is from the Vermont Maple Sugar Makers Association/Vermont Maple Promotion Board; the Massachusetts Maple Producers Association has produced a helpful video about making maple cream and maple candy. If you haven’t tried these maple candies, be forewarned: They’re like no other treat you’ve ever experienced.

Source: Maple Syrup Candies

Prevent Soggy or Burnt French Toast by Frying in Oil Instead of Butter

A plate of perfect French toast—crispy round the edges, custardy in the center, and capped off with an amber kiss of maple syrup—is a thing of breakfast time beauty. On the other hand, slices that turn out soggy and squishy, charred in some spots and undercooked in others… well, there’s nothing sadder. What could go wrong? We’ve identified five common French toast mistakes and how to fix them.

Source: You’ve Been Making French Toast All Wrong (Here’s How to Do It Right)

To get the best of both worlds – the smoke point of butter is lower, but yields more flavour and colours the food more quickly, often burning.  So heat a little oil, then add some butter…  You get the benefits of more colour and flavour from the butter, and get a slightly higher smoke point than if using just butter which is more likely to avoid burning yet still allowing for crispy non soggy toast. This method works well for many things, particularly fish.