What All Those Confusing Fitness Terms Actually Mean

It isn’t easy getting fit. There’s a lot to learn: Your workout itself, whether the number of reps you do matters, and then there’s all the gym and exercise lingo you’ve never heard before. Say no more. We understand, and we’ve put together this primer to help.

Keep in mind that fitness jargon is endless, so this list isn’t comprehensive. It is made up of many terms that you may have heard before but didn’t understand, or heard a trainer toss around.

Source: What All Those Confusing Fitness Terms Actually Mean

It’s important to mention that lifting to failure happens when you cannot perform another rep with perfect form.

Alti-Tooties: Why You Fart More in Flight

In-flight flatulence is a common discomfort – so what causes it? And what can we do to save embarrassment? David Robson speaks to a Danish doctor with some surprising answers.

…It may be a universal experience, but as Rosenberg combed the medical literature, he found that there are some surprisingly prevalent misconceptions surrounding our wind. Despite popular belief, studies show men are not more flatulent than women, for example (though they may be more public about it); in fact the same study from the late 90s found women’s flatulence has a higher concentration of the smelly sulphurous compounds, and was rated as having a more potent odour by a few unlucky judges. And although beans may be known “as the musical fruit”, a recent experiment found that it is not nearly as inflammatory as most would believe, and its effects differ widely from person to person. Foods known to reduce flatulence include fish, rice, dairy products, fish and strained fruit juice – since they leave less waste in the gut for fermentation.

…Airlines also tend to make sure the in-flight food is low in fibre, but high in carbohydrates – a balance that is more likely to calm our digestion. It’s not clear when or how they came to these decisions – but we can guess that Brussels sprouts and cabbage left the in-flight menu at a fairly early point in aviation history.

Source: How to tackle the most embarrassing problem on planes

The article doesn’t mention it, but it’s a known issue to people whose altitude increases by as much as 5,000 ft/1.5 KM.  And obviously, dairy will be counterproductive for the lactose intolerant…

  • About that underwear – no skids on the tarmac
  • How do you know if a guy farted?  Don’t worry – he’ll tell you

Dying Your Hair May Not Be as Safe as You Think

The basic chemistry of hair dyes has changed little over the last century, but what do we know about the risks of colouring our hair, and why do we do it?

Every two months Barclay Cunningham goes through a process that begins with taking an antihistamine tablet. After a few hours, she smears a thick layer of antihistamine cream across her forehead, around her ears and over her neck. Finally, she shields the area with ripped-up plastic carrier bags.  All this so she can dye her hair.

It didn’t start out this bad. Cunningham coloured her hair for a decade without any problems. Then, one day, she noticed that the skin on her ears was inflamed after she’d dyed her hair. She fashioned plastic bag earmuffs and carried on colouring. But the allergic reaction persisted, so her precautions became more elaborate. Now if she dyes her hair without these measures, she gets an itchy, blistery, pus-filled rash that lasts for weeks.

Source: Why Dying Your Hair May Not Be as Safe as You Think

I have always been startled by how many people I know eat organic vegetables, drink only from glass, use only vinegar to clean their houses… and dye/colour their hair.