Why We Get Headaches From Exercise

Headaches happen for myriad reasons: dehydration, eyestrain, drinking a wee bit much the previous night, and exercising. Yes, exercise too, and they’re just as annoying as any other headache. Here’s the difference between exercise headaches and regular head pains, and how you can best treat or avoid them.

Source: Why We Get Headaches From Exercise

Chunder-bot Used to Confirm How Viruses Spread

Norovirus is famed for sending cruise ships scurrying back to port to unload hordes of violently ill passengers. Aside from its brutal symptoms—vomiting, diarrhea, cramps, and a general sense that death would be a fine option—the virus is famed for how easily it spreads. It has generally been assumed that the vomiting portion of the symptoms scatters small particles of liquid that carry the virus to new surfaces.

Source: Chunder-bot used to confirm how viruses spread

They built a vomiting simulator…

Why Do People Still Get the Plague?

People don’t die of the Black Plague in the 21st century — except when they do. And the disease won’t be going away any time soon.

Earlier this month, a high school student in Colorado died of the disease. On average, seven people in the U.S. catch the plague every year; some years, it’s only one, and in other years, it’s as many as 17. Worldwide, the plague strikes about 2,000 people every year, and about 10% of them will die. That’s quite a step down for the disease that killed nearly a third of the population of Medieval Europe in its heyday. But why hasn’t the plague faded quietly into the history books?

Source: Why Do People Still Get the Plague?

Lest we forget the story of WHO wanting to announce that malaria had been eradicated.  But the press release couldn’t happen, because the speaker came ill …with malaria. 😉

Here’s What Really Happens When You Force-Feed Someone

The American Medical Association and the Red Cross both condemn force-feeding as a form of torture. And yet, the U.S. government and the United Nations have both force-fed hunger-striking prisoners. The real problem? Most people probably don’t realize how complicated force-feeding is, and how much can go wrong.

Source: Here’s What Really Happens When You Force-Feed Someone

The article doesn’t cover ethics, just the physical aspects that get dealt with.  Still, there’s a reason major medical organizations condemn the practice.

Just One Fix: How to Know When You Actually Need Antibiotics

Antibiotics are strong medicines that can kill bacteria. But we have overused antibiotics for many years. As a result, we now have bacteria that resist antibiotics. Resistant bacteria cause infections that are harder to cure and more costly to treat.

Antibiotic-resistant infections can strike anyone. They can be passed on to others. For example, more and more healthy young people are getting skin infections from MRSA, a bacteria that resists many common antibiotics. MRSA is spreading in households, daycare, schools, camps, dorms, gyms, team sports, and the military.

Try to protect yourself and your loved ones. Here’s what you need to know to help prevent resistance:

Source: Antibiotics: When you need them—and when you don’t

The CDC provides similar information for adults, but more detail.  Reducing antibiotic prescribing is something that requires awareness from both doctors and patients.

No, it's not a tumour!

Maybe it’s a tumour?

Caffeine Overdose Awareness

The sudden death of 18-year-old Logan Stiner grabbed headlines last May when the high school senior died from a surprising and rare cause: a caffeine overdose.

Stiner’s family found a small bag of caffeine powder — sold legally in the U.S. and easily purchased over the Internet — in their home after the Ohio teen’s death. The official autopsy revealed that Stiner had experienced a seizure, along with cardiac arrhythmia, from ingesting a toxic amount of caffeine. Stiner, a wrestler and star student only one week from graduation, had a blood caffeine level over 20 times higher than that of a typical coffee drinker.

…While deadly caffeine overdoses are rare, less-severe overdoses are relatively common. There were more than 20,000 U.S. emergency room visits due to energy drink consumption in 2011, according to government data. Symptoms of mild caffeine toxicity include nausea, vomiting, heart palpitations, a racing heartbeat, agitation and hyperactivity, Wang says. And if you’re not used to caffeine, even a couple cups of coffee is enough to feel nausea and chest pain, Anderson says. In one case study, a woman was admitted to the emergency room for rhabdomyolysis after drinking less than five cups of coffee.

Source: Overdosing on Caffeine: A Deadly Trend

All things in moderation, and if necessary – accurate measurement.

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