Easily Save Over-Whipped Cream Without a Time Machine

If you do over-whip your cream past that soft peak stage and into the stage where it’s starting to get stiff and clumpy, there’s an easy fix: more cream! You’ll want to switch to whipping by hand to do this fix: simply pour about an extra tablespoon of heavy cream into the bowl and whisk gently, adding more cream tablespoon by tablespoon until it’s reached your desired consistency. It will actually come back from the edge.

Source: How to Save Over-Whipped Cream

When life gives you over-whipped cream, make butter 😉

What on Earth is Fake Cream Made Out Of?

It’s very easy to test, if you know someone who is lactose intolerant… 😉

The cream inside your Twinkie is not the same thing as the cream inside that eclair at the fancy French bakery—we know that, because real cream goes bad after a while, and can’t sit on shelves for months. So what’s really inside that Twinkie? (And are you sure you really want to know the answer?)

Source: What on Earth is Fake Cream Made Out Of?

Real buttercream frosting is just sugar and lard and vanilla, so I was expecting something along the lines of chemical fat.

Make Whipped Cream That Lasts by Adding Sour Cream

Now I always make my whipped cream in advance, with a little help from sour cream (and science).

Source: How to Make Whipped Cream Ahead of Time

You could add mascarpone and a small amount of powdered sugar to stabilize it. Tastes awesome, held it’s shape and didn’t weep/lose any moisture.  A little unflavoured gelatin would work too.

Cream of Tartar: How Much Vitamin K?

If you were concerned, don’t be.  Potassium bitartrate (AKA cream of tartar) has no vitamin K.  2 – 100 grams, no vitamin K.

How is it made?   According to Wikipedia (defaced it myself):

Potassium bitartrate crystallizes in wine casks during the fermentation of grapejuice, and can precipitate out of wine in bottles.

In food, potassium bitartrate is used for:

  • Stabilizing egg whites, increasing their heat tolerance and volume
  • Stabilizing whipped cream, maintaining its texture and volume
  • Anti-caking and thickening
  • Preventing sugar syrups from crystallizing
  • Reducing discoloration of boiled vegetables

Additionally it is used as a component of:

  • Baking powder, as an acid ingredient to activate baking soda
  • Sodium-free salt substitutes, in combination with potassium chloride