Make Almost Any Boring Protein Into a Delicious Meal by “Piccata-ing” it

A whole bunch of us grew up eating chicken piccata at Italian-American restaurants with our parents, or at least I did, preceded by an entire serving of fried calamari, and breadsticks too. I’d eat every last little swipe of sauce, excited at how it made the back of my tongue water, at how smooth it felt, at how it draped itself over long strips of pasta. It’s a thrilling sauce. Even more thrilling is the fact that you can use it on any protein that goes well with lemon and wine. (Even tofu and chickpeas!)

Source: How to Piccata Anything

This would work with a number of standard chicken dishes, just apply the sauce to whatever other meat you’re eating, even hot dogs and hamburgers.

Thicken Soup with Blended White Beans for a Gluten-Free Alternative

While some broths are destined to remain thin and wispy, other soups taste best when served thick and creamy. But what do you do when it’s too late to add a slurry to a meaty soup? Or you’re gluten-free and must skip flour and bread? Or are vegan and don’t like the idea of butter in your soup?

The answer to all these culinary obstacles lies in white beans. Blended white beans.

Source: Here Is My Favourite Gluten-Free Way to Thicken Soup

Roasted carrots would help thicken too, while sweetening.

For a moment, I thought the recipe suggested navy beans – which contain a low dose of vitamin K (1 mcg of vitamin K per cup).  But cannellini beans have:

  • 1 tablespoon/12 grams of white beans contains 0.7 mcg of vitamin K – 1% Daily Value (DV)
  • 1 ounce/28 grams of white beans contains 1.6 mcg of vitamin K – 2% DV
  • 100 grams of white beans contains 5.6 mcg of vitamin K – 7% DV
  • 1 cup/202 grams of white beans contains 11.3 mcg of vitamin K – 14% DV

The example recipe calls for 0.25 cup, so roughly 50 grams.  That’s likely to be around 3 mcg of vitamin K, or 3% DV.  Be aware so you can be careful!

The Surprising Health Benefits of Beans

Beans are a super healthy, super versatile and super affordable food. Beans are high in antioxidants, fiber, protein, B vitamins, iron, magnesium, potassium, copper and zinc. Eating beans regularly may decrease the risk of diabetes, heart disease, colorectal cancer, and helps with weight management. Beans are hearty, helping you feel full so you will tend to eat less.

As we get older, we need fewer calories and beans are a great way to boost the nutrition power of your meal without boosting the calories. A half-cup of beans has only about 100 calories.

Source: After-40 Nutrition: The Surprising Health Benefits of Beans

They missed something you can do with beans – make vegan brownies (recipe).  I’m conflicted about eating them – it’s way too healthy for a brownie.  I also like to add salsa to my navy beans.