A New Baker’s Guide to Choosing the Right Kind of Flour

Flour is one of those seemingly simple ingredients that, upon closer inspection, can be downright mystifying. This harmless looking powder has much more going on that you would think, and even though it’s in almost every recipe, it can be hard to know which variety to buy for the best pastries, breads, and cakes. Let’s examine this veritable bouquet, starting with the basics.

Source: A New Baker’s Guide to Choosing the Right Kind of Flour

Things absolutely worth noting to new bakers as well:

  • Make sure your oven is level
  • Get a probe thermometer in there for accurate temperatures. 328 isn’t the same as 325.
  • Get some good pans, and stock up on parchment paper. Nice light pans = nice, light cookies. Crisped up on the bottom, they’ll actually look golden instead of… cajun?
  • Anything will continue to cook in the pan that it’s in when you take it out of the oven.
  • Don’t leave it on the stove top after you take it out. Some ranges have the heat from the oven blowing out there. Put it on a cooling rack in a different room if you can.
  • Wilton and Michael’s are your best friends. Regular 40% off single item coupons. First thing I bought? Icing spatula. Changed my life and made smoothing chocolate for peppermint bark so much simpler.

This Is How Bleached Flour Changes The Taste of Your Cakes

You’ve seen labels advertising “unbleached” flour. Few labels announce that their flour is “bleached,” but that’s exactly what happens to most white flour. It’s not just about the color, though—it’s an actual chemical change. Here’s how it works and why your cakes just wouldn’t taste the same without it.

Source: This Is How Bleached Flour Changes The Taste of Your Cakes

Baking is easy to get wrong because it is really just particularly finicky applied organic chemistry.  Cooking is an art. Baking, a science.

Can Noodles Ever Be Healthy? Here’s The Lowdown On 10 Types

Traditional pasta has gotten a bad rap (high in carbs, full of white flour). But there are lots of other noodles on the market that can actually be — dare we say it — good for you.

“They may look and taste similar, but noodles can be made from many different raw ingredients — from wheat to buckwheat to seaweed — and their nutritional benefits vary,” nutritionist Jessica Marcus, MS, RD, tells Yahoo Health. But no matter which you choose, watch your portion sizes. “Between half a cup to a cup of cooked noodles should satisfy you without overloading your blood sugar,” Marcus says.

Here’s the 411 on which of these squirmy, squiggly edibles you should put on the dinner table, and which ones you should leave behind.

Source: Can Noodles Ever Be Healthy? Here’s The Lowdown On 10 Types

Brief rundown of each type, but rare informational.  I don’t make much pasta to know how available some of the types are, but that’s likely to be different between various chains and such.

The aspect of calories and carbs can be dealt with via portioning.  There’s lots of articles online suggesting that most cook too much pasta when portioning for meals like spaghetti.